Monthly Archives: August 2016

Video Games (Addendum)

I have been made aware by some of my subscribers that they were unable to view the video that was embedded in the last post.  To view that video here’s the site:  https://youtu.be/8vxWsnk0kXU

Sorry for the confusion.

 

Video Games

Pony News
I had that open question of what to do about the cost of the starter rebuild, namely should it be charged against the Cost-O-Meter, or just be considered an ongoing maintenance cost?  Well, I got my answer.  Ever since my cousin, Bill, reminded me that the quarters I welded into the Pony’s oil pan should be included in the C-O-M, I’ve kind of considered him the unofficial blog accountant.  As you can tell from his reminder, he’s a real stickler.  He weighed in on this recent matter and said that I should consider the starter rebuild cost maintenance.  Cool, so we’re still shy of $4,000 on the old C-O-M.

I did spend a few dollars on hardware, however, when I converted my side panel attachment system to “quick release.”  But I’ll tell you, it was money well spent.    The side panels are usually held on by seven screws with washers and nuts behind the panels.  There’s a lot of stuff that one needs to get at behind those panels (battery, cables, fuel shut-off, steering box), and it’s a pain in the ass to remove all those screws every time you want to get inside there.  My attachment process only involves three attachment points all accessible from the exterior of the tractor.  I put together a little YouTube video demonstrating for other Pony owners how they can make the conversion, and it’s included below.  When you play it you’ll be able to see the neat, new system.

Although my acting certainly won’t earn me any Academy nominations, credit to son, Andrew, for the seamless videography.  And from that credit you have likely deduced that Andy was her for a visit, and on that you would be correct.  We had a barrel of fun canoeing out on the local lake, trying out new beers in the local brew pubs, and grilling anything and everything out on the grill (since he does not have access to that in NYC).  And, he always enjoys taking the Pony out for a spin (or two) on the “back 40,” so following are a couple of photos taken during one of those rides.

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Man At Work, Well OK, Play Really

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Son and Pony Taking a Breather

The only mishap occurred during the second ride, which I guess is my fault; we ran out of gas.  That Pony is a gas hog!

Other Pony News
A few weeks back I got a rather cryptic note into the blog simply asking me for the length of a Pony.  I went down to the garage, put a tape to the Pony and sent the dude the measurement (105 inches).  Then a week later I got an email from the same guy, Len Sharp, and it turns out he was fixing to bid on a Pony and wanted to make sure it fit on his trailer.  Turns out his was the winning bid and he sent the photo below of his prize.

1951 Pony

1951 Pony

Man, if my Pony had looked that good when I bought it, it would have cut 3 years off the restoration time.  Anyway, congrats Len, and good luck with your restoration.

Finally, in non-Pony news my Mom (Carol) will have her 93rd birthday next week, so I’d like to take this opportunity send out love from The Princess and me and our wishes for many, many more happy birthdays.  Thanks for reading.

From “The Morning 40”

You know that “old wives tale” about being able to stand an egg on its end when there’s a full moon?  Of course it’s malarkey, but a recent incident got me to wondering.  A few weeks ago I was just a few miles from home booking it down Old Greensboro Highway on the bike.  A car passed me and set a pine cone to spinning in the middle of the road.  Before I got to it the pine cone had stopped spinning and miraculously ended-up standing on its end.  I couldn’t believe what I was seeing, almost like magic.  After I passed I watched in the rear view mirror as car going the other way messed it all up.  I guess I shouldn’t consider this quite so magical when I also remember a bike ride a few years back when one of those pine cones fell out of a tree and made a direct hit on my head!  Magical indeed!  I guess the moral here is, if you ride enough miles in a state with a bazillion pine trees, eventually you’ll see a pine cone do just about anything.  However, here’s the spooky thing.  I went back and checked the date of that ride.  It was July 19, and according to the Farmers Almanac, that was the date of July’s full moon.  Hmmmm.

On Tuesday’s morning 40, there was a different type of incident.  Riding north on Morrill Mill Road, a fox came rippin’ out of some tall grass, saw me, and had he not immediately done a U-turn, would have been clobbered by a pick-up truck coming the other way in the fox’s lane.  I’m taking credit for saving his life.

Pony News
Just after I got back from vacation (cycling on the San Juan Islands of Washington State), I got an email from a guy at the Central Washington Ag Museum.  How’s that for coincidence?  Seems he had recently stumbled across this blog and wanted to pass along that the museum has a Pony that it has restored.  He sent along a few photos, and I’ve included them below.

Massey Harris 'Before' Photo

Museum Restoration Project

 

Massey Harris Parade Photo

1950 Pony After Restoration by the Museum

When I saw these photos, two things immediately came to mind.  First, boy does that “before” shot bring back some memories (not all of them good), and second, I wouldn’t want to be at that early stage of a restoration ever again.  They got the job done though didn’t they?  Nice looking Pony.

My Pony goes on vacation each summer making the big trip from Gene’s garage to mine.  So, last Saturday I called Gary Talbert (official tow truck driver to the blog), and he did the usual efficient job of getting the Pony back home.  A new problem showed up though, both before the trip and after loading.  After I shut down the engine, the starter kept on running.  I had the Pony’s generator rebuilt some time ago, but since the starter has always worked, I never had it rebuilt.  Yesterday I pulled the starter and drove it over to Burlington, NC to the same place that rebuilt the generator.  They say the work should be completed in two or three days.  But now here’s the issue.  Since the Pony has been up and running for some time, and the restoration is largely completed, should the cost of this rebuild go into the Cost-O-Meter, or be treated as post-restoration maintenance/repair?    With the C-O-M bumping up against $4000, you can probably guess how I’m leaning, but I’ll go by whatever you folks say.

I’ll call this next topic, “Crazy Photo Captions.”  They’re both from the Wall Street Journal.

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Now, there’s nothing at all funny about terror attacks, so please don’t get on me for insensitivity.  I just include this here because it says something to me that the guy they pull out of an attack on a hospital isn’t a nurse, or an orderly, or a doctor, but a LAWYER?

OK, you’re allowed to laugh at this next one.

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Either this was a very unfortunate choice of caption, or that dog’s name is Peter.

Just a couple of sentences on the vacation.
1.  The San Juan’s are beautiful.
2.  It was a full contingent of my old Philly pals (plus some), island hopping and biking.  Great company and lot’s of fun.
3.  Weather was spectacular, sunny everyday and no higher than mid-70’s.
4.  Took a half-day whale-watching trip and saw orcas and humpbacks.
5.  Bald eagles there are as common as robins.
6.  Quote of the trip.  I was at an open-air market buying trinkets for The Princess.  There was a kid in a stroller screaming his head off and simply would not stop.  I heard one of the stall-owners finally say, “Somebody throw some water on that kid!”  No, it wasn’t Donald Trump.
7.  Favorite incident.  I climbed 4.7 miles up Mt. Constitution (average grade close to 8%).  At the top I was standing at a concession stand buying ice cream (what else?) and a woman came up behind me and said, “I’m buying this guy’s ice cream.”  After I regained my composure, I managed to thank her and tell her how sweet that was.  She told me that she was a cyclist and that she had passed me as I was climbing the mountain, and that she just had to tell me how impressed she was.  I’m not kidding; I almost cried.  Thank you again, Dianna.

Don’t forget to weigh-in on the C-O-M question and as always, thanks for reading.